Classics goes Horror?

I think by this time everyone has heard about Pride and Predjudice and Zombies, and Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters. And more and more books like that make their appearences now. When I was in Bath I visited the local Waterstones (bookstore) and found this shelf there:
Classic spin-offs

I was quite amazed by it! Apart from the afore mentioned Pride and Predjudice and Zombies and Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters there was also: Mr Darcy Vampyre, Vampire Darcy’s Desire, Little Vampire Women, Queen Victoria Demon Hunter, Henry VIII Wolfman, Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter, Android Karenina and Jane Slayer. I had never seen such a large collection of these spin-offs before! I have not read any myself (nor do I at this moment really plan to), so I cannot give you my personal opinion of them. But I think it is very interesting though, this whole phenomenon!

If anyone who reads this has read any of those books (or any other book like them that wasn’t in the picture) I would really love to hear your thoughts on it! Or what your opinion is regarding all these spin-offs!

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11 Responses to Classics goes Horror?

  1. BECKY HORNOK says:

    HI, AURORA! A FRIEND (WHO PREFERS HORROR TO JANE AUSTEN) GAVE ME VAMPIRE DARCY’S DESIRE. I STARTED OUT VERY SKEPTICAL AND KEPT COMPARING IT TO PRIDE AND PREJUDICE, BUT THEN I GOT INTO IT AND JUST APPRECIATED IT FOR WHAT IT WAS, AND I ACTUALLY ENJOYED IT. I FOUND MYSELF WONDERING WHAT WOULD HAPPEN NEXT WHEN I WAS AWAY FROM IT. I ALSO READ ONE CALLED JANE BITE’S BACK, WHICH SUGGESTS THAT JANE AUSTEN IS A VAMPIRE CURRENTLY LIVING IN NEW YORK, AND IT WAS NOT QUITE AS INTRIGUING, BUT GOOD. THESE ARE THE ONLY 2 I’VE READ, AND I WOULD SAY THAT MY EXPERIENCE SO FAR IS THAT THEY ARE ENTERTAINING READING AS LONG AS YOU DON’T EXPECT THEM TO BE JANE:)

  2. Malene says:

    I am a little annoyed by these spin-offs. Mainly because I find the horror-zombie genre quite ridiculous.. I don’t like the idea of turning old, beloved classics into..well…rubbish in my opinion. I have glanced at a couple of them, but they are definitely not for me :S
    I think if Jane Austen was alive, she would sue!

  3. Emily says:

    I’m planning on borrowing my friends copy of pride and prejudice and zombies, an I am expecting it to be very funny (after reading the first page already). I love zombies, and Jane Austen, and I feel it’s something that you have to be good humored about. It is an insanely ridiculous idea, and that is why it is so funny. The books I find to be rather annoying are the ones that are spinoffs/sequels to original stories (I found one that was about Darcy cheating on Lizzie, and it irked me to no end). sorry for the rambling.

  4. Emily says:

    (A different Emily than the one above…)

    Personally, I wouldn’t touch any of these books with a ten-foot pole. I’m a purist, and like Malene, I don’t like seeing classics messed with, especially in ways that would *never* have so much as occurred to the original authors. The idea of, say, something as sweet as Little Women mixed with the goriness of vampires (since I see they’ve done that too) just makes me feel sick.

  5. Jennifer says:

    Hi Aurora,
    These vampire/zombie books turn me off too. I am not the least tempted to read one.
    Jennifer

  6. Jenean says:

    I am a Jane Austen purist, Ive read about these versions and it quite infuriates me that they’d mess with my favorite books, what would Jane Austen think? I am sure she (and everyone else from the Regency era) would find it absurd and so do I.
    If people want to read/write rubbish various about monsters so be it that’s their business but can’t people please leave Jane Austen and all of the other wonderful classic books alone?

  7. Jenean says:

    oops! I meant to say any classic books not “my favorite books”, they are my favorites that’s just not what I meant to say.

  8. Aurora says:

    Thank you all for your comments and opinions! I have greatly enjoyed hearing all your thoughts about this! Thanks! 😀

  9. Karen says:

    Hello, Aurora, how are you?

    Well, I have never read any of these books too, but I’m sure they wouldn’t please me.
    I love reading ghost stories, like “The Red Room”, by H. G Wells, or witch stories, like “Harry Potter” series. However, I really don’t think it’s a good idea to mix up classical novels which have absolutely nothing to do with supernatural happenings with stories about vampires, ghosts, zombies and company. It’s a completely nonsense on my mind! It’s a disrespect for the original author. This is my opinion.

    Here, in Brazil, some of these “weird” books have been published, like “Pride and Prejudice and Zombies” as well as “Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters”. But now I see there are a lot of more from this nonsense, I can just say I’m amazed! “Little Vampire Women”, “Jane Slayer”… oh, God, what is that???

    Hugs,
    Karen

  10. Aurora says:

    Hi Karen,

    I am well thank you. 🙂

    Like you I enjoy some books like that on occasion. But I prefer them to keep the styles separated. 🙂

    Hugs

  11. Sixer says:

    Salutations Aurora,
    I know this post is a little old now, but in case you’re still collecting opinions I thought I’d give you mine, hazy though it may be. Though I was at first offended by the abomination that is “Pride and Prejudice and Zombies,” I couldn’t help being curious about it, so I gave it a try last summer.

    I didn’t get far.

    Large sections of the book are directly copied from Pride and Prejudice, as you probably could have guessed, but, woven throughout, are references to zombies in –shire, explanations of the life of a zombie fighter, random battle scenes, etc. What remains is heavily modified, but (what I read of it) followed the original story arc pretty well. I found the descriptions of the fights to be a little much, but what really threw me off was what the writer did to Austen’s dialogue. In the drawing room scene at Netherfield park, where Miss Bingley tries so hard to win Mr. Darcy’s attention, the author managed to turn the conversation into a more “modern” form of banter, complete with innuendo. That’s when I returned the book to the library.

    I hope that helps you make your decision. I didn’t realize there were so many versions of them out now. Good reading,

    Sixer

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